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Short film

Whales in a Changing Ocean

In Antarctica, nothing is stationary. The only constant is change. One noticeable and increasingly evident change is the recovery of the humpback whales that feed in the waters off the Antarctic Peninsula, after industrial whaling almost wiped them out. In February 2020, wildlife filmmaker Richard Sidey was invited to join a team of scientists undertaking humpback whale research in Antarctica with Conservation International. Whales in a Changing Ocean follows the team as they observe humpback whale behavior and gather information vital to protecting the Antarctic continent into the future.
Part of The Greatest Sanctuary
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On February 9, 2020, Antarctica exceeded 20°C (68°F) for the first time, after researchers logged a record temperature of 20.75°C (69.3°F).

Warmer temperatures are contributing to annual ice loss that is six times greater than in the 1990s, putting this unique ecosystem in jeopardy. Even small-scale melting would raise global sea levels and cause flooding around the world.

While nations work to address climate change, we can also act this year to secure the creation of three vast marine sanctuaries in the Southern Ocean.

In October 2021, delegations are considering three new marine protected areas (MPAs) at the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) meeting. Together, the East Antarctica, Antarctic Peninsula, and Weddell Sea MPAs would cover approximately four million square kilometers, protecting the vital habitats of whales, penguins, krill, and other Antarctic species.

Sign the petition urging world leaders to deliver the largest act of ocean protection in history in Antarctica in 2021
Credits
Conservation International
Environmental organization

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The Greatest Sanctuary

The race to protect Antarctica’s future